Handmade Music Clubhouse

Cigar Box Guitar Headquarters - CBG HQ

I know I see a lot of guys using a jig to use their table saw to make scarf joint angle cuts. What is the advantage of using the table saw? Has anyone tried a chop saw? I would imagine the blade will be a major factor. I have very smooth blades on both. I feel like my chop saw would be easier.

Views: 3604

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Hey Jason. I cant cut a smooth, straight 10 to 12 degree angle on my chop saw. The cut is also about 4'' long on a 3/4'' thick neck. The table saw has a larger surface which helps keep the neck straight and at the right angle, very important when doin a scarf joint. A nice sharp finish blade works wonders, no sanding after you cut. .. A sliding chop saw might work, but i dont have one... Good luck and keep us posted.
Yeah I had a feeling. I wanted to see if there were any folks on here that use the chop saw often. Maybe with a finish blade and a jig. My chop saw is 10" and can get through most of my smaller necks. My table saw however, is only 9" and after I build a sled, etc... there's not a lot of height to the blade.

rodney fruits said:
Hey Jason. I cant cut a smooth, straight 10 to 12 degree angle on my chop saw. The cut is also about 4'' long on a 3/4'' thick neck. The table saw has a larger surface which helps keep the neck straight and at the right angle, very important when doin a scarf joint. A nice sharp finish blade works wonders, no sanding after you cut. .. A sliding chop saw might work, but i dont have one... Good luck and keep us posted.
I can't get 12 degrees on my chop saw. How would you do that? Mine only goes to 35 or so.
That's a good point Diane. I hadn't even checked that! Guess there's the answer to that question...

Diane in Chicago said:
I can't get 12 degrees on my chop saw. How would you do that? Mine only goes to 35 or so.
a chop saw can be made to work, if it's a decent quality one. helps to add a 45 degree fence (you'll need to make something to fit your rig) - then that shallow angle can be accomplished. the blade has to be absolutely perpendicular to the table (90 deg., straight up & down), as well - the slightest deviation will show up when you flip it around for the join. Can it be done? yes. but a table saw is easier to set up for the task.
Yeah. I guess I just need to figure out how to a make a more shallow jig for my smaller blade.

Dave K. said:
a chop saw can be made to work, if it's a decent quality one. helps to add a 45 degree fence (you'll need to make something to fit your rig) - then that shallow angle can be accomplished. the blade has to be absolutely perpendicular to the table (90 deg., straight up & down), as well - the slightest deviation will show up when you flip it around for the join. Can it be done? yes. but a table saw is easier to set up for the task.
I have both a chop saw and table saw and to be honest i prefer using my band saw to cut scarfs. it does leave room for sanding and clean up but i don't mind.

Jason May said:
Yeah. I guess I just need to figure out how to a make a more shallow jig for my smaller blade.

Dave K. said:
a chop saw can be made to work, if it's a decent quality one. helps to add a 45 degree fence (you'll need to make something to fit your rig) - then that shallow angle can be accomplished. the blade has to be absolutely perpendicular to the table (90 deg., straight up & down), as well - the slightest deviation will show up when you flip it around for the join. Can it be done? yes. but a table saw is easier to set up for the task.
I agree with the bandsaw cut. Much safer and more control. All you need is a good sharp block plane and chisel to clean it up and get that perfect fit.
Here's what I came up with. My band saw is garbage and I can't cut a straight line. Some day I'd like a decent one so I can cut cool stuff again. This photo is a reflection. Apparently my web cam can't take normal pictures....

That's the general idea, jason. you might want the angle a touch taller (2"), or a bit stiffer (steel vs. aluminum), but that may work fine as is. make sure you've got a good quality carbide-tipped blade (freud are pricey but last - dewalt are adequate) with a lot of teeth - for trim work (gives a very smooth cut), and sanding should be minimal.
This is my table saw jig. I leave it over at the community woodshop. I"m going there tonight -- hope it is still there!

I decided to move my fence back toward my body so that the neck would sit over wood and have some support. I can't think of a disadvantage of it yet. I also added two hand holds rather than just one. Just for extra push. If the Aluminium flexes too much I could always add a few more fastners. I have it set to 12 degrees right now. Right now if I max out the blade I can do a 1.5" piece with a hair to spare.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2020   Created by Ted Crocker.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service