Handmade Music Clubhouse

Cigar Box Guitar Headquarters - CBG HQ

 

I was looking on Youtube for who knows what and came across this

It looked too industrial and then I saw this:

http://www.wood-carver.com/construction.html I figured I could use some boat rollers on tubing or rollerblade wheels in tracks.

 

I also saw this simpler version:

In the vids it seemed a little wobbly but we can fix that with bracing:

 

I'll add more or you can add more as the info comes along, If you have built one...Please share the knowledge

 

MZ-HANDYMAN

Views: 6152

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I haven't, but thanks for sharing this. The brake they added to the one you linked to seems like a useful idea... I figure being able to vary the resistance to movement would help control, and bicycle brakes are ready made for this.

A quick thought: I'd guess the success of such a device depends on rigidity and tolerances. A simple trick I learned from a bike trailer builder is to add diagonal cable braces angling up to a central mast. On the one in the photo you posted it looks like the follower arm (the screwdriver) could flex all over the place (where all over the place = anything more than you want, a small flex would really matter with some carvings).
I've attached a sketch. There are probably better ways to do it but it popped in my head as soon as I saw the photo. It is a good way to make a light, very rigid but adjustable frame
here's the sketch.
Attachments:
I have a gunstock duplicator machine that I am building and is about 90% completed. The upper portion weights about 200 pounds and is made from 6061T6 aluminum alloy and welded steel. My machine is based on a parallelogram , like the front suspension of a modern car. This was built this way to keep the cutter always straight up and down , not going through an arc. The more ridged and heavy it can be made the better. I just need to build the main frame. Eli Whitney invented this type of machine around 1840 to build gunstocks for the government.

But the one pictured would work well for you, but it will not take the heavy cuts. I think the one you have pictured would be grand for carving out guitar necks as well. Folks that carve duck decoys use machines like the one you have pictured. I will post the photos of mine in a few days.

I am not an expert on the matter, but I have a lot of friends that have the type of machine I am building. They sell for about $12,000.

Thanks
Bob:)
When I started this machine my goal was to build gunstocks. I moved to So Cal and gun is a dirty word here. So I have not finished it. But I have been giving it some thought , it might be good for roughing out guitar necks. The machine is not wide enough to build a Les Paul body, but it could make two necks or gunstocks at the same time. There are lots of way to build a copy machine and I know you can build one as well without welding or machining. Cheers Bob:)

Old Lowe,
If hind sight were 20-20.... When I started building my machine I did think about building guitars, but thought I would never get to it. My machine could carve a top for a large cigar box (I think about 11 inches wide max), fiddle or mandolin sized instrument though.

Thanks
Bob:)

AAA Old Lowe said:
They make guitars with this same machine today but the machine I have seen copies one guitar and carves about 20 at once and of course it is automated.
The video I saw they were carving archtops inside and out of of chunks of wood and it was really neat to see the master carver sitting there eating a sandwitch while 20 artchtop guitars were being carved out.

Nice job on building the one you have Bob!
What you can do is elevate your carver and make the table move so you can do larger projects that would make double the length of movement in half the space.

By the way, THAT IS FRIGGIN AWESOME!!!

Bob Harrison said:
When I started this machine my goal was to build gunstocks. I moved to So Cal and gun is a dirty word here. So I have not finished it. But I have been giving it some thought , it might be good for roughing out guitar necks. The machine is not wide enough to build a Les Paul body, but it could make two necks or gunstocks at the same time.

There are lots of way to build a copy machine and I know you can build one as well without welding or machining.

Cheers
Bob

MZ, Thanks for the kind words. What is not shown is the under carrage and rails, that part has not been made yet. This machine can be made to be any length , but the width is rather fixed. But for crafting necks we are there. On youtube there is a guy carving a banjo neck. What the heck if I need a carver wider than this one I will make it.

Cheers
Bob:)

MZ-HANDYMAN said:
What you can do is elevate your carver and make the table move so you can do larger projects that would make double the length of movement in half the space.

By the way, THAT IS FRIGGIN AWESOME!!!

Bob Harrison said:
When I started this machine my goal was to build gunstocks. I moved to So Cal and gun is a dirty word here. So I have not finished it. But I have been giving it some thought , it might be good for roughing out guitar necks. The machine is not wide enough to build a Les Paul body, but it could make two necks or gunstocks at the same time.

There are lots of way to build a copy machine and I know you can build one as well without welding or machining.

Cheers
Bob

I'd love to build a machine like that.
Hey all,

I had a thought on the carver machine that I built or anybodys for that matter. If you were to replace the router with a 2 x 48 belt sander you could machine sand guitar necks to the point all they would need is the final sanding. I bet a neck could be sanded machined in about 30 minites or less. The finished neck would be as good as the pattern used...

There I go thinking again
Bob:)

Jason May said:
I'd love to build a machine like that.
They make grinding bits (I think they're called "BURR BITS" or "GRINDING BURRS" that have a very fine tooth pattern...Ya got me thinking too.

Maybe set the original 1/64" higher than the blank for cutting then lower original to use the burr bit.


Bob Harrison said:
If you were to replace the router with a 2 x 48 belt sander...

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2020   Created by Ted Crocker.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service