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How about a discussion on Jigs for CBGs.  Things that are easy to make, but also add a repeat-ability to builds.  I got to thinking when Charles W Brown suggested I need a fret cutting jig, so I got to thinking... Bridges, saddles, f-holes Tuner locations, Head stock, etc.   Thoughts?

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Great idea Dick, heres a couple of simple tools I made for fretting. In the beginning i would put a piece of masking tape on each side of the neck of a factory fretted guitar and make little marks where the nut & frets were. Then I would transfer both pieces of tape to my build neck and play connect the dots, so to speak with a pencil. This worked OK but left a lot of room for error. and if you tried to save & reuse the tape, stretching came into the equation. So I made 2 simple scales from a piece of aluminum flat stock. One has the 3 popular scale lengths from nut to bridge. The other has the fret positions for the 2 scale lengths that I use most. For dulci fretting, just skip the selected frets. You can see the sharpie marks for dulci fretting. The actual fret positions have been notched into the scale so the marks don't wear off.

David, I have been using an Alverez acoustic with a 26" scale.  My first build, build 4&5 were done this way.  Carefully lining up yhe new fretboard nect to the Alverez and marking it off, then going to my Miter box.  The others I used a 24" scale and a 25" scale.  It may be coincidence, but, I don't see, feel, or hear a lot of difference, except that I'm alway happier with the tone of the 26 inchers.  So...what is the reason for the different scales?  I think I would be just as happy with making all my builds to the same scale.  Unless of course there are some other considerations of which I'm always open to.   Feedback...?

Well, for me its about feel. I've been a Gibson guy since the mid 70's. Gibson's were always more comfortable for me to play. I didn't know anything about scale length then, I just knew a Les Paul or SG felt better to me that a Tele or Strat. And because of that, a 24 3/4 scale just feels right to me. I do use 25" a lot too, it's the traditional Dobro scale. I use that on most things that will be sliders.

The nice thing about these homemade scales, the measurement is spot on every time. Install the nut then just push the scale up to the nut and mark the fret positions. I don't have a miter box, I just use a square to mark my lines. Then I locate the bridge position off the nut. Always perfect intonation all the way up the neck.

My fretting saw is a joke. It's a dedicated hacksaw that I ground the kerf off of, .023 thick. My depth gauge is a piece of tape on the blade. Frets seat nice and hold tight. No glue. I'm a hack, but I get results.
Dick Mott said:

David, I have been using an Alverez acoustic with a 26" scale.  My first build, build 4&5 were done this way.  Carefully lining up yhe new fretboard nect to the Alverez and marking it off, then going to my Miter box.  The others I used a 24" scale and a 25" scale.  It may be coincidence, but, I don't see, feel, or hear a lot of difference, except that I'm alway happier with the tone of the 26 inchers.  So...what is the reason for the different scales?  I think I would be just as happy with making all my builds to the same scale.  Unless of course there are some other considerations of which I'm always open to.   Feedback...?

A couple more little doodads that I use for repeatability. Simple cardboard templates with tuner & screw hole locations, f hole template & palm tree sound hole template. Easy to make, easy to replace. Zero cost.

David, I know exactly whee you are coming from.  I just need to have repeatability in my builds without repeating all of the measuring, marking, etc.  I made a 25" Resonator and it sounds OK.  But if I want to make another, I will have to re-measure & remark all over again.  with a good Jig, I would drop the 1/4" fretboard into the jig, clamp it down and cut my fret positions.  If I wanted other scales, I would have to make other jigs.  This would save terrific time and effort.  Today I delivered two boxes, and immediatly had another person wanting one for himself.  With good jigs, most of the places that i make errors are eliminated and I could deliver in half the time.  

David Johnson said:

Well, for me its about feel. I've been a Gibson guy since the mid 70's. Gibson's were always more comfortable for me to play. I didn't know anything about scale length then, I just knew a Les Paul or SG felt better to me that a Tele or Strat. And because of that, a 24 3/4 scale just feels right to me. I do use 25" a lot too, it's the traditional Dobro scale. I use that on most things that will be sliders.

The nice thing about these homemade scales, the measurement is spot on every time. Install the nut then just push the scale up to the nut and mark the fret positions. I don't have a miter box, I just use a square to mark my lines. Then I locate the bridge position off the nut. Always perfect intonation all the way up the neck.

My fretting saw is a joke. It's a dedicated hacksaw that I ground the kerf off of, .023 thick. My depth gauge is a piece of tape on the blade. Frets seat nice and hold tight. No glue. I'm a hack, but I get results.
Dick Mott said:

David, I have been using an Alverez acoustic with a 26" scale.  My first build, build 4&5 were done this way.  Carefully lining up yhe new fretboard nect to the Alverez and marking it off, then going to my Miter box.  The others I used a 24" scale and a 25" scale.  It may be coincidence, but, I don't see, feel, or hear a lot of difference, except that I'm alway happier with the tone of the 26 inchers.  So...what is the reason for the different scales?  I think I would be just as happy with making all my builds to the same scale.  Unless of course there are some other considerations of which I'm always open to.   Feedback...?

Kool!  I really like those.  Thanx

David Johnson said:

A couple more little doodads that I use for repeatability. Simple cardboard templates with tuner & screw hole locations, f hole template & palm tree sound hole template. Easy to make, easy to replace. Zero cost.undefined

A great material for making design jigs or templates is the plastic credit/gift cards and cash cards that are often discarded after use. Just an idea.

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