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Cigar Box Guitar Headquarters - CBG HQ

I am considering buying a Pin Router and   I am curious if anyone has used a Pin Router to cut out a head-stock for their CBG.

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bandsaw or scrollsaw is what i use.

One of the first tutorials I came across when I got into making cigar box guitars was this one from O'brien. If you have a drill press and a 1/8" (or 3 or 4mm) drill bit, it's a great option.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_b3CWkHHSYE

I use this method for cutting my headstocks, as well as a lot of other applications where I need to get my hands in close to whatever it is I'm routing. I do use a band saw, table saw, and a few other tools to make templates out of either hardboard (Masonite) or acrylic sheet  (Plexiglas.) It's a bit slower than using a router, but it's one heck of a lot safer. Set the drill press at somewhere around 2500 RPM, and it works great. No burning, chipping, or expensive bits. If a bit gets dull, just grind an angle on the chuck end of another 1/8" drill bit and off you go.

Rusty thanks for the tip.

Art

Rusty Pup (Mark) said:

One of the first tutorials I came across when I got into making cigar box guitars was this one from O'brien. If you have a drill press and a 1/8" (or 3 or 4mm) drill bit, it's a great option.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_b3CWkHHSYE

I use this method for cutting my headstocks, as well as a lot of other applications where I need to get my hands in close to whatever it is I'm routing. I do use a band saw, table saw, and a few other tools to make templates out of either hardboard (Masonite) or acrylic sheet  (Plexiglas.) It's a bit slower than using a router, but it's one heck of a lot safer. Set the drill press at somewhere around 2500 RPM, and it works great. No burning, chipping, or expensive bits. If a bit gets dull, just grind an angle on the chuck end of another 1/8" drill bit and off you go.

Back in the 80s I ran a commercial wood working business out of my basement. I purchased a 5hp 1/2" Stanley router and made my own pin router. I built a heavy table and mounted the router beneath it. I then laminated up a pin head from 3/4" plywood and held this to the table using heavy pipe clamps. I used industrial carbide spiral cutting bits to do the finish cutting after rough cutting the shape using a band saw. It worked great at a fraction of the cost of a commercial pin setup. 

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